Lovers of Tuscany’s ‘paradise’ beach have factory to thank

By Kelly Velasquez AFP

Holidaymakers splash in the turquoise waters of the Rosignano Solvay beach in Tuscany and laze on its pristine white sands—most of them fully aware that the picture-perfect swimming spot owes its allure to a nearby factory.

“I discovered it on Google Maps,” said Dutch tourist Lieuya, who travelled to the beach with his family to enjoy a setting more reminiscent of the Caribbean than of northern Italy.

“I was told it’s not dangerous, that the colour comes from the soda factory next door,” he told AFP.

Questions have lingered for decades over why the sea and sand are such startling colours—with some environmentalists suggesting the phenomenon is caused by heavy metals emitted by the plant.

The beach, about four kilometres (two-and-a-half miles) long, is named after the Solvay factory, which produces soda ash for making glass as well as sodium bicarbonate, or baking soda.

The plant strenuously denies polluting the surrounding coastline.

Tourists taking a dip or settling down in beach chairs for a light pasta lunch are not worried about the striking contrast between the waters off Rosignano Solvay and those of the nearby Monte alla Rena beach.

“Every time I come here, I think that if swimming is allowed by local, regional and national authorities, we can believe them when they say that the water is clean,” says Italian teacher Marina, who declined to give her last name.

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PHOTO CREDIT: By for kind concession of the site http://www.lungomarecastiglioncello.it/, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=455263