The anti-vaccine movement’s new, dangerous lunatic fringe

Imagine if you are the parent of an eleven year old girl who decided one day to check your daughter’s Facebook account only to find a message in your daughter’s mailbox that said this:

“Your mother is a fat ugly lazy piece of shit who tried to kill you,” the message read. “She is a bully and suffers from mental problems. She is under investigation for the hate groups and illegal computer crimes she’s committing. I hope you like your new home. You can thank me when you’re older.”<br /.

According to Jezebel, the message is an example of the latest tactics the anti-vaccine movement is using in order to silence support for mandatory vaccinations. While both the pro and anti sides have traded verbal jabs with each other, the anti-vaccine movement is now resorting to insults, death threats and intimidation.

The rhetoric overall has become more strident due to California’s legislature considering SB 277 which would mandate children who attend state schools to be vaccinated. This done in response to a measles outbreak that occurred in the state earlier this year in which low vaccination rates have been attributed to the anti-vaccine movement.

Back in May The Sacramento Bee reported that during the controversy surrounding SB 277, anti-vaccine parents not only found an ally with the California Chiropractic Association (CCA) but the group’s lobbyist encouraged opponents the bill to share the personal information of lobbyists who worked for the California Medical Association (CMA) and the California Academy of Family Physicians (CAFP). Jezebel also points out one woman who testified in favor of the bill had photos of her and her family tweeted along with untrue allegations made that she was associated with the pharmaceutical company Merck. Anti-vaxxers even went so far as to call into question the woman’s sanity. Anti-Vaccine groups have not only formed alliances with Left-leaning, hippie organizations but they have also linked arms with anti-abortion organizations and even the Church of Scientology and Nation of Islam.

I have blogged in the past that anti-vaccine groups have been influenced by the environmentalist movement, but Jezebel cites a Los Angeles Times commentary authored by Emory University historian Elena Conis that reveals the anti-vaccine movement itself is a direct outgrowth of environmentalism:

The anti-vaccination movement got its start in the ‘60s and ‘70s, according to Emory University historian Elena Conis, who told the Los Angeles Times it was a natural outgrowth of the environmentalist movement and an increasing engagement among women in their children’s medical decisions. Combine that with post-Watergate wariness about the government’s hidden motives, and you’ve got a perfect recipe for vaccine paranoia.

“Women were doing what health feminists were doing when they looked at risks of birth control pills that they said doctors had known about and hidden,” Conis told the newspaper. “It made perfect sense that they would use the same questions with respect to their children’s healthcare. They were also using the language of environmentalism, [which] illustrated that only after we had used new technologies did we realize they had risks”—technologies, here, being used in reference to DDT and asbestos.

Now that the link has been established it is safe to say that the anti-vaccine movement is one more way environmentalists want to eradicate human life on Earth. The entire environmentalist movement involves attacking humans on many fronts. Now the anti-vaccine movement is revealed to be a wing of the enviromentalist movement’s attack on human beings. This time it is on out ability to fight diseases and its clear greens would rather see humans suffer and even die from diseases like measles, polio or small pox.