Study: GMOs get bad rap in Europe

By Jonathan Knutson / Agweek on May 27, 2019

GMO plants and crops are controversial worldwide — especially so in Europe, where they’re strictly regulated. Now, a new study by Danish researchers finds that the regulations aren’t justified and may stand in the way of important agricultural innovation.

In a related development, the Danish Council of Ethics this spring released recommendations that include reevaluating Europe’s anti-GMO stance and that call on the European Union to change its regulatory system. It’s unclear what effect, if any, the council’s opinion might have on EU GMO policy.

The study, published in the journal Transgenic Research, was conducted by Andreas Christiansen and Klemens Kappel of the University of Copenhagen and Martin Marchman Andersen of theTechnical University of Denmark.

The study notes that EU rules on genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are so restrictive that it’s nearly impossible to get authorization to cultivate a GMO crop in the EU. And even if a GMO is authorized, individual member states of the EU can still ban the crop.

The EU policies are based in part on arguments about the risk and “unnaturalness” of GMO plants, but the arguments don’t hold up logically, according to the report.

GMO plants and crops are controversial worldwide — especially so in Europe, where they’re strictly regulated. Now, a new study by Danish researchers finds that the regulations aren’t justified and may stand in the way of important agricultural innovation.

In a related development, the Danish Council of Ethics this spring released recommendations that include reevaluating Europe’s anti-GMO stance and that call on the European Union to change its regulatory system. It’s unclear what effect, if any, the council’s opinion might have on EU GMO policy.

The study, published in the journal Transgenic Research, was conducted by Andreas Christiansen and Klemens Kappel of the University of Copenhagen and Martin Marchman Andersen of theTechnical University of Denmark.

The study notes that EU rules on genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are so restrictive that it’s nearly impossible to get authorization to cultivate a GMO crop in the EU. And even if a GMO is authorized, individual member states of the EU can still ban the crop.

The EU policies are based in part on arguments about the risk and “unnaturalness” of GMO plants, but the arguments don’t hold up logically, according to the report.

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